Sparassidae

Known as: Eusparassidae, Heteropodidae 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1999-2016
02419992016

Papers overview

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2015
2015
The genus Curicaberis gen. nov. is described to include the type species, Curicaberis ferrugineus (C.L. Koch, 1836) comb. nov… (More)
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2015
2015
The genus Pseudopoda Jäger, 2000 is revised from material collected in Sichuan province. A molecular analysis shows the utility… (More)
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2014
2014
The spider genus Cebrennus Simon, 1880 is revised again after thirteen years. Four new species are described: Cebrennus atlas… (More)
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2014
2014
The phylogeny of the spider family Sparassidae is comprehensively investigated using four molecular markers (mitochondrial COI… (More)
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2010
2010
Palystes kreutzmannisp. n. is described from habitats close to Kleinmond, in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Spiders of… (More)
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2008
2008
At night the Namib Desert spider Leucorchestris arenicola performs long-distance homing across its sand dune habitat. By… (More)
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Review
2006
Review
2006
The phenomenon of lengthening copulatory structures in the spider family Sparassidae is reviewed. One can distinguish between a… (More)
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2005
2005
The Sparassidae are distributed worldwide, with over 80 genera and about 800 described species. The necessity of a revision of… (More)
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2005
2005
According to observations of Micromata virescens in its spezific habitats. all in central Germany, the stenochronous species has… (More)
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2003
2003
Spiders of the family Sparassidae occur on most continents in tropical and temperate regions of the world. They are large… (More)
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