Security through obscurity

Known as: Security by obscurity, Security through obfuscation, Security through obsurity 
In security engineering, security through obscurity (or security by obscurity) is the reliance on the secrecy of the design or implementation as the… (More)
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Papers overview

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2018
2018
It has been recently shown that deep neural networks (DNNs) are susceptible to a particular type of attack that exploits a… (More)
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2018
2018
We study the problem of finding a universal (image-agnostic) perturbation to fool machine learning (ML) classifiers (e.g., neural… (More)
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2018
2018
Deep neural networks (DNNs) have proven to be quite e‚ective in a vast array of machine learning tasks, with recent examples in… (More)
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2016
2016
Obfuscation has emerged as a promising approach to ensure supply chain security by countering the reverse engineering (RE) based… (More)
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2014
2014
Obfuscation protects code by making it so impenetrable that access to it won't help a hacker understand how it works. 
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2013
2013
h I RECENTLY READ an editorial in an electronics magazine about license plate readers, devices used by police and government to… (More)
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2011
2011
Shannon sought security against the attacker with unlimited computational powers: if an information source conveys some… (More)
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2009
2009
Modern System-on-Chip (SoC) designs rely heavily on reusable, verified and bug-free hardware Intellectual Property (IP) cores… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
[Brackets] enclose editorial explanations. Small ·dots· enclose material that has been added, but can be read as though it were… (More)
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