Sclerostomy

Known as: Sclerostomies 
Surgical formation of an external opening in the sclera, primarily in the treatment of glaucoma.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2007
2007
PURPOSE To investigate the role of Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) in regulating human… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
PURPOSE To determine whether postoperative application of a broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor, GM6001… (More)
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1993
1993
A prospective study of 30 glaucoma patients (one eye in each patient) treated by an ab externo holmium laser sclerostomy is… (More)
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1991
1991
A THC:YAG laser (thulium, holmium, chromium-doped YAG crystal) was used to create thermal sclerostomies in 21 glaucomatous eyes… (More)
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1991
1991
Four solid-state lasers with three fiberoptic delivery systems were used to perform laser sclerostomies in an acute-injury rabbit… (More)
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1990
1990
We describe an ab-interno laser sclerostomy procedure using the method termed dye-enhanced ablation with a slit-lamp delivery… (More)
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1989
1989
We report the use of a continuous wave Nd:YAG (CW-YAG) laser focused through a sapphire crystal to create a filtering bleb by ab… (More)
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1989
1989
We developed a model of glaucoma fistulizing surgery in the rabbit. As is the case with wound healing in general, there was… (More)
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1988
1988
The authors undertook an investigation to evaluate the efficacy and complications of performing internal sclerostomy with the… (More)
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1984
1984
A Q-switched neodymium-YAG laser was used to produce a corneoscleral perforation in human cadaver eyes. A through-and-through… (More)
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