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SAS

Known as: SAS (programming language), SAS/STAT, Interactive Matrix Language 
SAS (Statistical Analysis System) is a software suite developed by SAS Institute for advanced analytics, multivariate analyses, business intelligence… Expand
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Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Experiments on patients, processes or plants all have random error, making statistical methods essential for their efficient… Expand
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Professionals and students with a background in two-way ANOVA and regression and a basic knowledge of linear models and matrix… Expand
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Acknowledgments. Chapter 1. Introduction. Chapter 2. Regression. Chapter 3. Analysis of Variance for Balanced Data. Chapter 4… Expand
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
From the Publisher: If you are a researcher or student with experience in multiple linear regression and want to learn about… Expand
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
If you are a researcher or student with experience in multiple linear regression and want to learn about logistic regression… Expand
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
 
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Highly Cited
1995
Highly Cited
1995
Biomedical and social science researchers who want to analyze survival data with SAS will find just what they need with this easy… Expand
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Highly Cited
1995
Highly Cited
1995
A plurality of stator core rings are produced, each having circumferentially spaced pole teeth arranged symmetrically to a… Expand
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Highly Cited
1994
Highly Cited
1994
From the Publisher: Packed with concrete examples, Hatcher's book provides an introduction to more advanced statistical… Expand
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Highly Cited
1979
Highly Cited
1979
 
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