Ruppiaceae

Known as: ditch-grass family 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1993-2015
02419932015

Papers overview

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2015
2015
Soil profiles were collected at a depth of 30 cm in ditch wetlands (DWs), riverine wetlands (RiWs) and reclaimed wetlands (ReWs… (More)
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2014
2014
A qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with 92 farmers and 42 policy managers in Wuxi County, the Three Gorges Reservoir… (More)
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2014
2014
Many aquatic plant and seagrass species are widespread and the origin of their continent-wide ranges might result from high gene… (More)
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2013
2013
Alismatidae is a wetland or aquatic herb lineage of monocots with a cosmopolitan distribution. Although considerable progress in… (More)
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2011
2011
Flowers of Ruppia are usually arranged into an open two-flowered spike, but sometimes two lateral flowers are congenitally united… (More)
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2011
2011
A study was conducted during the summer of 2009 (from July to September) to characterize mosquito communities among different… (More)
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2011
2011
Flowers of Ruppia are normally arranged into an open two-flowered spike, but sometimes the two lateral flowers are congenitally… (More)
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2010
2010
UNLABELLED PREMISE OF THE STUDY The monogeneric family Ruppiaceae is found primarily in brackish water and is widely… (More)
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2009
2009
Ruppia maritima L. (Ruppiaceae), a monoecious seagrass, is widely distributed in temperate and tropical regions. In this paper… (More)
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1993
1993
Within the angiosperm subclass Alismatidae (= superorder Alismatiflorae), contemporary taxonomists have often assigned the… (More)
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