Rice's theorem

Known as: Rice-Myhill-Shapiro Theorem, Rices Theorem, Rice theorem 
In computability theory, Rice's theorem states that all non-trivial, semantic properties of programs are undecidable. A semantic property is one… (More)
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1980-2016
02419802016

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2011
2011
Cellular automata are a parallel and synchronous computing model, made of infinitely many finite automata updating according to… (More)
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2010
2010
A cellular automaton is a parallel synchronous computing model, which consists in a juxtaposition of finite automata whose state… (More)
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2008
2008
The proofs of major results of Computability Theory like Rice, Rice-Shapiro or Kleene's fixed point theorem hidemore information… (More)
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2008
2008
We propose here an extension of Rice’s Theorem to first-order logic, proven by totally elementary means. If P is any property… (More)
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2007
2007
The trace subshift of a cellular automaton is the subshift of all possible columns that may appear in a space-time diagram. We… (More)
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2001
2001
Rice’s Theorem states that all nontrivial language properties of recursively enumerable sets are undecidable. Borchert and… (More)
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2000
2000
Rice’s Theorem states that every nontrivial language property of the recursively enumerable sets is undecidable. Borchert and… (More)
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1997
1997
Rice's Theorem states that every nontrivial language property of the recursively enumerable sets is undecidable. Borchert and… (More)
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1996
1996
Rice's Theorem says that every nontrivial semantic property of programs is undecidable. It this spirit we show the following… (More)
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1994
1994
Kari, J., Rice’s theorem for the limit sets of cellular automata, Theoretical Computer Science 127 (1994) 2299254. Rice’s theorem… (More)
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