Random-access stored-program machine

Known as: Random access program machine, RASP machine, RASP 
In theoretical computer science the random-access stored-program (RASP) machine model is an abstract machine used for the purposes of algorithm… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1964-2015
01219642015

Papers overview

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2015
2014
2014
machine for modular imperative agent-based modeling This section provides an abstract machine specification for the modular… (More)
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Review
2014
Review
2014
The scientific study of programming languages requires a formal specification of their semantics. However, the incentives of… (More)
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2013
2013
ion Abstraktion Acceptance problem Akzeptanz-Problem Accepted akzeptiert Accepting state akzeptierender Zustand Ackermann… (More)
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2013
2013
Chaitin’s notion of program elegance, that is of the smallest program to satisfy some specification, does not explicitly take… (More)
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2011
2011
Weight and cardinality constraints constitute a very useful programming construct widely adopted in Answer Set Programming (ASP… (More)
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2009
2009
In this paper, we extend our previous work on Resourced ASP, or for short RASP, where we have introduced the possibility of… (More)
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2004
2004
In 1964, Elgot and Robinson introduced the Random-Access Stored Program (RASP) machine model “to capture some of the most salient… (More)
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1971
1971
In this paper we explore the computational complexity measure defined by running times of programs on random access stored… (More)
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1964
1964
A new class of machine models as a framework for the rational discussion of programming languages is introduced. In particular, a… (More)
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