Prunus spinosa

Known as: Blackthorn, Prunus spinosa L., Sloe 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2014
2014
Introduction . Many underutilized wild fruits have great nutritional and functional potential, providing chemical compounds with… Expand
  • table II
  • table III
  • table IV
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
2013
2013
Aim. Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa L.) is quite widespread bush occurring in Poland. Its fruits are easily available food products… Expand
  • table 1
  • table 2
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
This ethnobotanical study aims to describe the domain of wild edible plants in Gorbeialdea (Biscay, Iberian Peninsula), and to… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 2
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
2010
2010
Synchronisation of the phenology of insect herbivores and their larval food plant is essential for the herbivores’ fitness. The… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 1
  • figure 4
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
2009
2009
A B S T R A C T The studied material were the fruits of 7 wild species: dog rose (Rosa canina L.), blackberry (Rubus caesius L… Expand
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2006
2002
2002
Plum pox virus (PPV) was found naturally infecting blackthorn (Prunus spinosa L.) plants in different regions in Hungary. The… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
2001
2001
From the flowers of Prunus spinosa L. a mixture of alpha- and beta-amyrine, a mixture of ursolic and oleanolic acids, ursolic… Expand
Is this relevant?
1999
1999
The antioxidative activity of three anthocyanin pigments, extracted from the fruits of chokeberry, honeysuckle and sloe, were… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 3
  • figure 2
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
1981
1981
SummaryThe phenology of fruit trees and avian consumption of fruit were examined in Wytham wood, Oxford in 1979–1980. Ripe fruit… Expand
  • figure 1
  • table 1
Is this relevant?