Prunus spinosa

Known as: Blackthorn, Prunus spinosa L., Sloe 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1981-2016
02419812016

Papers overview

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2017
2017
INTRODUCTION Prunus spinosa L. (blackthorn, sloe) is a com- mon species in the wild flora of Europe. Marmalade, syrup, and… (More)
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2016
2016
Polyploid Prunus spinosa (2n = 4×) and P. insititia (2n = 6×) represent enormous genetic potential in Central Europe, which can… (More)
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2014
2014
Sloe (Prunus spinosa L.) is a shrub native to Europe. In Germany, 50–80 % of all planted sloe is imported. Little is known about… (More)
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2013
2013
This study aimed to analyse the phenolic composition of wild fruits of Arbutus unedo (strawberry-tree), Prunus spinosa… (More)
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2009
2009
Prunus spinosa, blackthorn, exists as wild populations that inhabit uncultivated uplands of Coruh Valley in the northeastern part… (More)
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2009
2009
BACKGROUND AND AIMS In the UK, the flowers of fruit-bearing hedgerow plants provide a succession of pollen and nectar for flower… (More)
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2004
2004
Plum pox virus (PPV) was found naturally infecting blackthorn (Prunus spinosa L.) plants in different regions in Hungary. The… (More)
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2004
2004
Blackthorn (Prunus spinosus), a member of Rosacea family is well known for causing infections and tissue reactions of synovial… (More)
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2001
2001
Eight flavonoids were isolated from the flowers of Prunus spinosa: kaempferol, quercetin, kaempferol 3-O-alpha-L… (More)
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1981
1981
The phenology of fruit trees and avian consumption of fruit were examined in Wytham wood, Oxford in 1979–1980. Ripe fruit was… (More)
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