Proximal epiphysis of ulna

Known as: Upper end of ulna, Ulnar head, Caput ulnae 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1984-2016
012319842016

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2016
2016
Background The ulnar head is a key stabilizer of the wrist and forearm. The authors investigated the possibility of using the… (More)
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 1
  • figure 5
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
2016
2016
PURPOSE Using a novel technique, we assess and describe the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) anatomy. The purpose of this study was… (More)
Is this relevant?
2016
2016
Ulnar head and neck fractures are rare and the mechanism of injury is not always clear. We describe a case of a distal radioulnar… (More)
  • figure 2
  • figure 1
  • figure 3
  • figure 6
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
2015
2015
In the present study, the adaptability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) was evaluated using conventional computed tomography… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 1
  • table 2
Is this relevant?
Review
2012
Review
2012
This study reports the intermediate-term results of four patients from a series eight patients who have had an insertion of a new… (More)
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
A two-dimensional quantitative XRD measurement of the orientation of biological apatite (BAp) in an isolated trabecula of a mouse… (More)
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 6
  • figure 7
Is this relevant?
1996
1996
The Sauvé-Kapandji procedure comprises distal radioulnar arthrodesis with screwing of the caput ulnae at the basis of the radius… (More)
Is this relevant?
1993
1993
A series of 13 patients is reported in which a Sauvè-Kapandji procedure consisting of arthrodesis of the articulation between the… (More)
Is this relevant?
Review
1992
Review
1992
A follow up of 57 wrists with resection of caput ulnae shows different value to different groups of patients. The painful… (More)
Is this relevant?
1984
1984
A relatively or absolutely too long ulna leads always to pain in the wrist, so that a compensation in length of both forearmbones… (More)
Is this relevant?