Programmable-gain amplifier

Known as: Amplifier (disambiguation), PGA, Programmable gain amplifier 
A programmable-gain amplifier (PGA) is an electronic amplifier (typically an operational amplifier) whose gain can be controlled by external digital… (More)
Wikipedia

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2014
2014
This paper presents the design of a constant bandwidth gain-linear PGA with current density constant technique (CDCT). It… (More)
  • figure I
  • table I
Is this relevant?
2011
2011
This paper presents an architecture for the analog baseband of an Zero-IF UWB receiver that is slightly different from the… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 5
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
2011
2011
A cochlear implant (CI), also called a bionic ear or electronic cochlea, is an implantable electronic device that can partially… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 1
  • figure 3
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2009
2009
In previous works, the authors reported on binary-weighted switching and reconfiguration techniques to design programmable gain… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 4
  • figure 3
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2006
2006
This paper presents a CMOS programmable gain amplifier (PGA) with 3dB bandwidth greater than 290MHz. The PGA can provide 50dB… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2005
2005
A highly linear, digitally programmable gain amplifier (PGA) based on an inherently linear MOS current divider (MCD) is presented… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 5
  • figure 6
Is this relevant?
2004
2004
Power consumption and device area are two critical specifications in implantable cochlear systems. CMOS process scaling has… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
A highly linear programmable-gain amplifier (PGA) is fabricated using a 0.35m CMOS technology. High linearity and constant wide… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 4
  • figure 3
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2003
2003
Although it is simple to measure temperature in a stand-alone system without the help of Microchip’s Programmable Gain Amplifiers… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
A digitally programmable-gain amplifier (PGA) is realized using a 0.35 /spl mu/m CMOS technology. Constant bandwidth and high… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 4
  • figure 3
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?