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Pregroup grammar

Known as: Pregroup 
Pregroup grammar (PG) is a grammar formalism intimately related to categorial grammars. Much like categorial grammar (CG), PG is a kind of type… Expand
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Papers overview

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2014
2014
This paper studies mappings between CCG and pregroup grammars, to allow a transfer of linguistic resources from one formalism to… Expand
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2011
2011
We show that vector space semantics and functional semantics in two-sorted first order logic are equivalent for pregroup grammars… Expand
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2008
2008
Pregroup grammars are a context-free grammar formalism which may be used to describe the syntax of natural languages. However… Expand
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2007
2007
Pregroup grammars were introduced by Lambek [20] as a new formalism of type-logical grammars. They are weakly equivalent to… Expand
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2006
2006
SUMMARY This article identifies pregroup planning—the thinking and preparation done by the social worker in developing a group… Expand
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2005
2005
We describe the derivations in a pregroup grammar as the 2-cells of a free compact 2-category defined by the grammar. The 2-cells… Expand
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2002
2002
A liquid metering dispenser is actuated by a trigger. The trigger releases a valve rod which is spring actuated to close a fluid… Expand
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2001
2001
At first sight, it seems quite unlikely that mathematics can be applied to the study of natural language. However, upon closer… Expand
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1997
1997
Foreword Preface Introduction Key Concepts of This Chapter The Purpose of This Book The Mutual-Aid Approach The Theoretical Basis… Expand
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
A protogroup is an ordered monoid in which each element a has both a left proto-inverse al such that ala ≤ 1 and a right… Expand
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