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Power law scheme

The power law scheme was first used by Suhas Patankar (1980). It helps in achieving approximate solutions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and… Expand
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Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2016
2016
Combustion phenomenon is one of the most important problems involved in different industries, such as gas turbines, combustion… Expand
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2014
2014
The present study carries out numerical physical insight into the flow and heat transfer characteristics. The governing equations… Expand
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2011
2011
In this paper, the laminar heat transfer of natural convection on vertical surfaces is investigated. Most of the studies on… Expand
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
The present study carries out numerical computations of the plate-circular pin-fin heat sink and provides physical insight into… Expand
2008
2008
Unsteady laminar natural convection in an enclosure with partially thermally active side walls and internal heat generation is… Expand
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2007
2007
The solution variables are stored at the triangular circumcenters based on unstructured meshes,which can avoid discretization… Expand
2006
2006
There are many assumptions that have been considered when describing black liquor droplet combustion. These include assuming an… Expand
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2005
2005
Abstract A three-dimensional computational model is developed to analyze fluid flow in a channel partially filled with porous… Expand
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2003
2003
A numerical analysis of a parabolic partial differential equation (PDE) which originates from the governing equations of… Expand
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