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Pomacea maculata

 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2020
2020
Invasive apple snails, Pomacea canaliculata and P. maculata, have a widespread distribution globally and are regarded as… Expand
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2017
2017
Invasive exotic species are spreading rapidly throughout the planet. These species can have widespread impacts on biodiversity… Expand
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2017
2017
Dispersal and local environmental factors are major determinants of invasive species distribution. We examined how both dispersal… Expand
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2017
2017
Resacas, or oxbow lakes, form from old river channels. In the Rio Grande, resacas provide habitat for diverse wildlife, including… Expand
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2017
2017
Golden Apple Snail (GAS) is the most destructive invasive rice pest in Southeast Asia. The cost of synthetic molluscicides, their… Expand
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2016
2016
Abstract The golden apple snail, Pomacea maculata Perry, 1810 (Gastropoda: Ampullariidae) is one of the most serious invasive… Expand
2015
2015
Pomacea maculata (formerly P. insularum), an apple snail native to South America, was discovered in Louisiana in 2008. These… Expand
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2014
2014
Snails from the genus Pomacea lay conspicuous masses of brightly colored eggs above the water. Coloration is given by… Expand
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2013
2013
Two species of apple snails, Pomacea canaliculata and Pomacea maculata (formerly Pomacea insularum), have invaded many countries… Expand
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Highly Cited
2013
Highly Cited
2013
Nonindigenous apple snails, Pomacea maculata (formerly Pomacea insularum), are currently spreading rapidly through the… Expand