Persistent Vegetative State

Known as: State, Persistent Vegetative, Persistent Unawareness State, PVS (Persistent Vegetative State) 
Vegetative state refers to the neurocognitive status of individuals with severe brain damage, in whom physiologic functions (sleep-wake cycles… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
BACKGROUND The minimally conscious state (MCS) is a recently defined clinical condition; it differs from the persistent… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
The persistent vegetative state (PVS) is a devastating medical condition characterized by preserved wakefulness contrasting with… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
This report identifies evidence of partially functional cerebral regions in catastrophically injured brains. To study five… (More)
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2002
2002
Despite converging agreement about the definition of persistent vegetative state, recent reports have raised concerns about the… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
By use of H2(15)O positron emission tomography we have shown that functional connectivity between intralaminar thalamic nuclei… (More)
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1999
1999
Regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) was investigated with 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and positron emission… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
to make judgments about awareness or consciousness based on these results; however, it is clear that she not only perceived… (More)
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Review
1994
Review
1994
This consensus statement of the Multi-Society Task Force summarizes current knowledge of the medical aspects of the persistent… (More)
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Review
1994
Review
1994
  • The New England journal of medicine
  • 1994
 
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