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Percolation

Known as: Percolate 
In physics, chemistry and materials science, percolation (from Latin percōlāre, "to filter" or "trickle through") refers to the movement and… 
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Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Ultrathin, uniform single-walled carbon nanotube networks of varying densities have been fabricated at room temperature by a… 
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Many important macroscopic properties of materials depend upon the number of microscopic degrees of freedom. The task of counting… 
Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Many important macroscopic properties of materials depend upon the number of microscopic degrees of freedom. The task of counting… 
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Highly Cited
1990
Highly Cited
1990
Abstract The subject of this paper is the evolution of Brownian particles in disordered environments. The “Ariadne's clew” we… 
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Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
The simplest growth models. The voter model. The biased voter model. The contact process. One-dimensional discrete time models… 
Highly Cited
1987
Highly Cited
1987
As magmas rise toward the surface, they traverse regions of the mantle and crust with which they are not in equilibrium; to the… 
Highly Cited
1983
Highly Cited
1983
Scaling laws are formulated for the behavior of a space-dependent fluctuating general epidemic process near the critical point… 
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Highly Cited
1978
Highly Cited
1978
SummaryAn improvement of Harris' theorem on percolation is obtained; it implies relations between critical points of matching… 
Highly Cited
1970
Highly Cited
1970
Highly Cited
1957
Highly Cited
1957
The paper studies, in a general way, how the random properties of a ‘medium’ influence the percolation of a ‘fluid’ through it… 
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