Parastrachia

 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2000-2013
02420002013

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2013
2013
Parastrachiidae is a small stinkbug family containing only one genus and two species, Parastrachia japonensis (Scott) (Hemiptera… (More)
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2013
2013
Host recognition is crucial during the phoretic stage of nematodes because it facilitates their association with hosts. However… (More)
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2007
2007
In contrast to an open environment where a specific celestial cue is predominantly used, visual contrast of canopies against the… (More)
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2007
2007
Females of the subsocial shield bug, Parastrachia japonensis (Parastrachiidae), are central-place foragers, collecting drupes for… (More)
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2006
2006
Nymphs of the univoltine shield bug, Parastrachia japonensis grow by feeding on the drupes of their sole food plant, which are… (More)
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2006
2006
The majority (75%) of femaleParastrachia japonensis (Hemiptera: Cydnidae), while caring for 1st and 2nd instar nymphs, foraged… (More)
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2005
2005
Parastrachia japonensis adults in diapause live mostly in aggregated conditions and can survive more than 1 year on only water… (More)
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2003
2003
The female subsocial shield bug, Parastrachia japonensis, provisions its nymphs by foraging on the ground in the forest during… (More)
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2000
2000
Females of the shield bug Parastrachia japonensis Scott progressively provision nymph-containing nests with drupes of the host… (More)
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2000
2000
The duration of copulation in the gregarious shield bug, Parastrachia japonensis Scott (Hemiptera: Cydnidae), is of two types… (More)
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