OpenJava

OpenJava is a programming tool that parses and analyzes Java source code. It uses a metaobject protocol (MOP) to provide services for language… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1998-2002
012319982002

Papers overview

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2002
2002
  • Johannes Beyer, Kasper B. Graversen
  • 2002
We present the concept of roles as described by various researchers. The concept is motivated by an example and followed up by… (More)
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2000
2000
Today, many dialects of traditional programming languages exist [6]. In most cases, they add some programming paradigm or… (More)
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2000
2000
This paper describes OpenAda, a reflective version of Ada that we developed to support research in software fault tolerance with… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
This paper presents OpenJava, which is a macro system that we have developed for Java. With traditional macro systems designed… (More)
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1999
1999
The JST language introduces an object synchronization aspect for the Java language. More precisely, JST provides developers with… (More)
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1999
1999
Checkpointing is a major issue in the design and the implementation of dependable systems, especially for building fault… (More)
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1998
1998
This paper presents that compile-time MOPs can provide a general framework resolving implementation problems of design patterns… (More)
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1998
1998
Connectors can be programmed exibly using an open language with a static meta-object protocol. Illustrated with an example from… (More)
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1998
1998
This paper presents that compile-time MOPs can provide a general framework resolving implementation problems of design patterns… (More)
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