Nominal techniques

Known as: Nominal 
Nominal techniques are a range of techniques, based on nominal sets, for handling names and binding, e.g. in abstract syntax. Research into nominal… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

1986-2017
051019862017

Papers overview

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Review
2016
Review
2016
Programming languages abound with features making use of names in various ways. There is a mathematical foundation for the… (More)
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2015
2015
We examine the key syntactic and semantic aspects of a nominal framework allowing scopes of name bindings to be arbitrarily… (More)
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2012
2012
We study languages over infinite alphabets equipped with some structure that can be tested by recognizing automata. We develop a… (More)
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Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
Our motivating question is a My hill-Nerode theorem for infinite alphabets. We consider several kinds of those: alphabets whose… (More)
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2011
2011
We are used to the idea that computers operate on numbers, yet another kind of data is equally important: the syntax of formal… (More)
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2010
2010
Nominal terms extend first-order terms with binding. They lack some properties of firstand higher-order terms: Terms must be… (More)
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2009
2009
Nominal algebra is a logic of equality developed to reason algebraically in the presence of binding. In previous work it has been… (More)
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2008
2008
The aim of this work is to obtain an interactive proof environment based on Isabelle/HOL for reasoning formally about… (More)
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2008
2008
Nominal techniques are based on the idea of sets with a finitelysupported atoms-permutation action. We consider the idea of… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
This paper describes a formalisation of the lambda-calculus in a HOL-based theorem prover using nominal techniques. Central to… (More)
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