Niveoscincus ocellatus

 

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1997-2018
01219972018

Papers overview

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Review
2015
Review
2015
The aim of this research was to identify the effects of Pleistocene climate change on the distribution of fauna in Tasmania, and… (More)
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2015
2015
The study of energy expenditure between populations of a wide ranging ectothermic species may provide an insight into how… (More)
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2011
2011
Recent research suggests that oxidative stress, via its links to metabolism and senescence, is a key mechanism linking life… (More)
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2011
2011
Plastic responses to temperature during embryonic development are common in ectotherms, but their evolutionary relevance is… (More)
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2010
2010
The timing of birth is often correlated with offspring fitness in animals, but experimental studies that disentangle direct… (More)
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2010
2010
Thirteen polymorphic tri- and tetra-nucleotide microsatellites are reported for the spotted snow skink (Niveoscincus ocellatus… (More)
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2006
2006
The majority of research into the timing of gonad differentiation (and sex determination) in reptiles has focused on oviparous… (More)
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2006
2006
The southern snow skink Niveoscincus microlepidotus is a viviparous alpine lizard with biennial reproduction, in which embryos… (More)
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2004
2004
A prominent scenario for the evolution of reptilian placentation infers that placentotrophy arose by gradual modification of a… (More)
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1997
1997
The reproductive cycle in males of the skink, Niveoscincus ocellatus, is characterised by testicular development during summer… (More)
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