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Nimbaphrynoides occidentalis

Known as: Mt. Nimba viviparous toad, Nectophrynoides occidentalis 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
Current studies on fetal membranes of reptiles are providing insight into three major historical transformations: evolution of… 
2005
2005
Compared to other monogenoidean groups, viviparous gyrodactylids exhibit extraordinary species diversity and broad host range. It… 
Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
The fecundity, longevity, mortality, and maturation of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Homoptera: Aphididae), were… 
Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Mean predation rates (± SD) on egg cases of the skates Bathyraja macloviana, B. albomaculata, Amblyraja doellojuradoi, and… 
Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Using four criteria proposed a decade ago by Brooks & McLennan to identify a case of adaptive radiation indicates that the… 
2003
2003
Although pregnant viviparous squamates are sometimes claimed to be able to resorb inviable eggs and embryos from the uterus… 
Highly Cited
1979
Highly Cited
1979
This paper describes the thermal biology of the common garter snake, Thamnophis sirtalis, a diurnal, viviparous colubrid. The… 
Highly Cited
1974
Highly Cited
1974
THE success of viviparous species is a result of their capacity to produce small numbers of advanced offspring with high…