Nail Biting

Known as: nail bite, Nail-biting, biting nails 
Common form of habitual body manipulation which is an expression of tension.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2012
2012
Behavioral addictions are a specific group of mental and behavioral disorders. At present, this group of disorders is not present… (More)
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2010
2010
BACKGROUND Human nail clippings are increasingly used in epidemiological studies as biomarkers for assessing diet and… (More)
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Review
2009
Review
2009
The basic science literature is replete with descriptions of naturally occurring or experimentally induced pathological grooming… (More)
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2008
2008
This study applied functional analysis methodology to nail biting exhibited by a 24-year-old female graduate student. Results… (More)
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2008
2008
BACKGROUND Nail biting (NB) is a very common unwanted behavior. The majority of children are motivated to stop NB and have… (More)
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2007
2007
OBJECTIVE To compare the frequency of nail biting in 4 settings (interventions) designed to elicit the functions of nail biting… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Visceral larva migrans syndrome by Toxocara affects mainly children between 2 and 5 years of age, it is generally asymptomatic… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Hoarding occurs relatively frequently in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and there is evidence that patients with hoarding… (More)
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1991
1991
Twenty-five adult subjects with severe morbid onychophagia (nail biting) and no history of obsessive-compulsive disorder were… (More)
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Highly Cited
1973
Highly Cited
1973
No clinical treatment for nervous habits has been generally effective. The present rationale is that nervous habits persist… (More)
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