Metatarsal Valgus

Known as: Out-Toeings, Metatarsus valgus, Out-Toeing 
A foot anomaly in which the forefoot is angled outward relative to the hindfoot.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2014
2014
BACKGROUND The progression of medial knee osteoarthritis seems closely related to a high external knee adduction moment, which… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 1
  • table 3
  • table 2
Is this relevant?
2013
2013
The present study shows how foot loading patterns may be deliberately altered by either in-toeing or out-toeing gait during… (More)
Is this relevant?
2010
2010
BACKGROUND Orthotic devices are used to help children progressively acquire a more physiologic walking pattern. METHODS To… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • table 2
  • table 1
Is this relevant?
2010
2010
Abstract There is a range of normal development in the shape of children's feet and legs, as well as their pattern of walking… (More)
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
A large external knee adduction torque during gait has been correlated with the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Though… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
BACKGROUND Some patients with Perthes disease develop abnormal gait in the transverse plane, that is, out-toeing or in-toeing… (More)
  • table 1
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 2
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
It is controversial as to whether osteotomy, by restoring a more normal pelvic anatomy, might improve the final outcome of… (More)
  • table 1
  • figure 1
  • table 2
Is this relevant?
2001
2001
The effect of changing the foot progression angle on the peak knee adduction moment (KAM) during stance was investigated in 48… (More)
Is this relevant?
1997
1997
Data on footprints and gait of 54 Hadzabe, 6-70 years of age expand understanding of pedal morphology of unshod people and assist… (More)
Is this relevant?
1983
1983
Torsional problems are common in children but rare in adults. Most resolve spontaneously; however, some require treatment. The… (More)
Is this relevant?