Meconium peritonitis

Inflammation of the peritoneum caused by an intrauterine intestinal perforation leading to presence of meconium within the fetal peritoneal cavity… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1948-2017
05101519482016

Papers overview

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2008
2008
BACKGROUND Meconium peritonitis is a rare disease with a fatal outcome. In Nigeria and Africa, there are only the occasional case… (More)
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2003
2003
OBJECTIVES To study the relationship between prenatal ultrasound features and postnatal course of meconium peritonitis. METHODS… (More)
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2003
2003
OBJECTIVES Intra-uterine bowel perforation can occur secondary to a variety of abnormalities and cause sterile peritonitis in the… (More)
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1999
1999
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE Although meconium peritonitis is a rare condition, the mortality rate can be as high as 40%. Meconium… (More)
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1999
1999
Hepatitis A virus has rarely been implicated in congenital infections. After maternal hepatitis A at 13 weeks' gestation… (More)
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1998
1998
Meconium peritonitis is a chemical peritonitis which occurs following bowel perforation during fetal life. It is generally looked… (More)
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1998
1998
A 33-year-old primigravida at 26 weeks gestation presented with fetal hydrops and fetal anemia following prior parvovirus B19… (More)
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1990
1990
The case of a neonate presenting with respiratory distress who had an incarcerated Bochdalek hernia with perforation and meconium… (More)
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1988
1988
Intraluminal meconium calcifications are a rare cause of neonatal abdominal calcifications and can easily be misinterpreted as… (More)
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1951
1951
Meconium peritonitis can have a wide range of presentations. This report discusses two cases that have recently appeared in our… (More)
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