Martin Dyer

Martin Edward Dyer (born 16 July 1946 in Ryde, Isle of Wight, England) is a professor in the School of Computing at the University of Leeds, Leeds… (More)
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2012
2012
Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis is widely used to measure microbial biomass and community composition in soil and other… (More)
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2011
2011
Sascha Seiferta, Marisa Thomab, Florian Stegmaierc, Matthias Hammond, Martin Kramera, Martin Hubere, Hans-Peter Kriegelb… (More)
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
This book focuses on a range of health system and policy issues related to caring for people with chronic conditions. Edited by… (More)
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2006
2006
In earlier work of Kristiansen and Niggl the polynomial-time computable functions were characterised by stack programs of… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Modern biology has shifted from "one gene" approaches to methods for genomic-scale analysis like microarray technology, which… (More)
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2005
2005
In general, not much is known about the arithmetic of K3 surfaces. Once the geometric Picard number, which is the rank of the N… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
We derive dynamic optimal trading strategies that minimize the expected cost of trading a large block of equity over a fixed time… (More)
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1998
1998
Recently there has been a good deal of interest in using techniques developed for learning from reinforcement to guide learning… (More)
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1998
1998
We consider the changes which occur in cosmological distances due to the combined effects of some null geodesics passing through… (More)
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