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Lovász conjecture

Known as: Lovasz conjecture, Lovász 
In graph theory, the Lovász conjecture (1969) is a classical problem on Hamiltonian paths in graphs. It says: Every finite connected vertex… Expand
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2013
2013
The b-chromatic number @g"b(G) of a graph G is the maximum k for which there is a function c:V(G)->{1,2,...,k} such that c(x) c(y… Expand
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2012
2012
The celebrated Erdos–Faber–Lovasz conjecture originated in the year 1972. It can be stated as follows: any linear hypergraph on n… Expand
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2011
2011
This paper proves that the fractional version of Hedetniemi's conjecture is true. Namely, for any graphs G and H, @g"f(GxH)=min… Expand
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2010
2010
We consider the Erdős-Faber-Lovász (EFL) conjecture for hypergraphs that are both regular and uniform. This paper proves that for… Expand
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2009
2009
This paper lays the foundation for a theory of combinatorial groupoids that allows us to use concepts like “holonomy”, “parallel… Expand
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2008
2008
A hypergraph, having n edges, is linear if no two distinct edges intersect in more than one vertex, and is dense if its minimum… Expand
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2007
2007
A metal layer is formed on a surface of a Group III-V compound semiconductor by placing the surface in contact with a metal… Expand
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2007
2007
A hypergraph H is linear if no two distinct edges of H intersect in more than one vertex and loopless if no edge has size one. A… Expand
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2005
2005
The groupoid of projectivities, introduced by M. Joswig, serves as a basis for a construction of parallel transport of graph and… Expand
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
To any two graphs G and H one can associate a cell complex Horn (G, H) by taking all graph multihomomorphisms from G to H as… Expand
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