Logluv TIFF

Logluv TIFF is an encoding used for storing high dynamic range imaging data inside a TIFF image. It was originally developed by Greg Ward for storing… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

1998-2012
0119982012

Papers overview

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2013
2013
Many proposed high dynamic range (HDR) video coding schemes employ a float to integer transform with a subsequent standard low… (More)
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2013
2013
A method of lossless compression of high dynamic range (HDR) images encoded in LogLuv32 format is presented. Simple bitplane… (More)
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2012
2012
  • A. Nagurammal, Dr. T. Meyyappan
  • 2012
In this paper, a generic visible watermarking with a capability of lossless image recovery is proposed. This method based on the… (More)
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2011
2011
This paper proposes a data hiding method for high dynamic range images with the LogLuv encoding format. To the best of our… (More)
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2010
2010
High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging represents a wide range of intensity levels found in real scenes ranging from direct sunlight to… (More)
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2007
2007
Effective color image and video coding is usually exploited coupling a compression method with the most suitable color space… (More)
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2006
2006
The human eye can accommodate luminance in a single view over a range of about 10,000:1 and is capable of distinguishing about 10… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
The raw size of a high-dynamic-range (HDR) image brings about problems in storage and transmission. Many bytes are wasted in data… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
The human eye can accommodate luminance in a single view over a range of about 10,000:1 and is capable of distinguishing about 10… (More)
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Is this relevant?