Linear arboricity

In graph theory, a branch of mathematics, the linear arboricity of an undirected graph is the smallest number of linear forests its edges can be… (More)
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1980-2018
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2010
2010
The linear arboricity la(G) of a graph G is the minimum number of linear forests (graphs where every connected component is a… (More)
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2007
2007
The linear arboricity of a graph G is the minimum number of linear forests which partition the edges of G. Akiyama, Exoo and… (More)
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2001
2001
We find upper bounds on the linear k-arboricity of d-regular graphs using a probabilistic argument. For small k these bounds are… (More)
  • table 1
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2000
2000
The linear arboricity la…G† of a graph G is the minimum number of linear forests which partition the edges of G. A graph is… (More)
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1999
1999
It is proved that the linear arboricity of every 1-planar graph with maximum degree ∆ > 33 is ⌈∆/2⌉. 
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1990
1990
An easy count ing argument shows here that la(G)>f . f f t " d i f f icu l ty is in establishing the upper bound. This problem… (More)
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Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
A linear forest is a forest in which each connected component is a path. The linear arboricity la(G) of a graph G is the minimum… (More)
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1987
1987
Akiyama, Exoo, and Harary conjectured that for any simple graph G with maximum degree A ( G ) . the linear arboricity / a ( G… (More)
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1984
1984
We prove that the linear arboricity of every 5-regular graph is 3. That is, the edges of any 5-regular graph are covered by three… (More)
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1980
1980
In a linear forest, each component is a path. The linear arboricity ~(G) of a graph G is defined in Harary [8] as the minimum… (More)
  • figure 2
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