Lazarus taxon

Known as: Lazarus, Lazarus species, Lazarus taxa 
In paleontology, a Lazarus taxon (plural taxa) is a taxon that disappears for one or more periods from the fossil record, only to appear again later… (More)
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2014
2014
Lazarus species, species that were thought to be extinct until found again, are of considerable public interest and attract major… (More)
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2011
2011
Workplace stress consistently has received a substantial amount of attention from practitioners and researchers alike. Many… (More)
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2009
2009
A specimen of Loftusia persica Brady is described that contains as a part of its inner test a specimen of Turborotalia pomeroli… (More)
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2007
2007
The University of the Witwatersrand, the National Research Foundation of South Africa, the Royal Society of London and PAST. 
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2006
2006
Genomic studies have shown that evolution can be based on clusters of genes that may be silenced and reactivated by regulator… (More)
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2002
2002
This article focuses upon a new preventive approach designed to improve personal stress management skills. The Coping Enhancement… (More)
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2001
2001
The many definitions and interpretations associated with the ‘Lazarus effect’ have considerably confused this notion. While… (More)
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1999
1999
Mass extinctions are often followed by intervals in which taxa disappear from the fossil record only to reappear again later… (More)
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1993
1993
SummaryAfter the end-Permian crisis and a global ‘reef gap’ in the early Triassic, reefs appeared again during the early Middle… (More)
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Highly Cited
1982
Highly Cited
1982
Although studies of major life events continue to dominate the stress literature, such events have not been shown to be strong… (More)
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