Language module

Known as: Language faculty 
Language module refers to a hypothesized structure in the human brain (anatomical module) or cognitive system (functional module) that some… (More)
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
Language acquisition and processing are governed by genetic constraints. A crucial unresolved question is how far these genetic… (More)
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2006
2006
In this article we discuss the notion of a linguistic universal, and possible sources of such invariant properties of natural… (More)
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2005
2005
We will devote our commentary to two topics from Ullman et al. s study: (1) the linguistic assumptions that underlie the Ullman… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Th is chapter outlines the theory (fi rst explicitly defended by Pinker and Bloom 1990), that the human language faculty is a… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
A new view of the functional role of the left anterior cortex in language use is proposed. The experimental record indicates that… (More)
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2000
2000
A multifunctional NIA 9 environment, [!'I'AI~-3, is presented. The environment has several NI,I ~ applications, inchtding a… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
A central topic for linguistic theory is the degree to which the communicative function of language influences its form. In… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Abstract This paper sketches a grammar of English relative clause constructions (including infinitival and reduced relatives… (More)
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Highly Cited
1994
Highly Cited
1994
Look under the hood of most theories of grammar or computational linguistic formalisms and you will find a "machine," often… (More)
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