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K-trivial set

Known as: K-trivial sets 
In mathematics, a set of natural numbers is called a K-trivial set if its initial segments viewed as binary strings are easy to describe: the prefix… Expand
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Papers overview

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2017
2017
We study the sets that are computable from both halves of some (Martin-Lof) random sequence, which we call \emph{$1/2$-bases}. We… Expand
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2016
2016
We show that a Martin-Lof random set for which the effective version of the Lebesgue density theorem fails computes every K… Expand
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2014
2014
The K-trivial sets form an ideal in the Turing degrees, which is generated by its computably enumerable (c.e.) members and has an… Expand
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2013
2013
I discuss part of the solution for the ML-covering problem [1]. This passes through analytic notions such as martingale… Expand
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2012
2012
Monotone complexity, Km, is a variant of Kolmogorov complexity that was introduced independently by Levin and Schnorr. The… Expand
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2011
2011
The field of algorithmic randomness is concerned with making precise the intuitive notion of the randomness of individual objects… Expand
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2009
2009
The sequences which have trivial prefix-free initial segment complexity are known as K-trivial sets, and form a cumulative… Expand
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2008
2008
A real is Martin-Löf (Schnorr) random if it does not belong to any effectively presented null $${\Sigma^0_1}$$ (recursive) class… Expand
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
AbstractLet R be a notion of algorithmic randomness for individual subsets of ℕ. A set B is a base for R randomness if there is a… Expand
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2005
2005
For given real α ∈ {0,1}∞, a presentation V of α is a prefix-free and recursively enumerable subset of {0,1}* such that $\alpha… Expand
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