K·p perturbation theory

Known as: K.p perturbation theory, K.p, K dot p theory 
In solid-state physics, k·p perturbation theory is an approximation scheme for calculating the band structure (particularly effective mass) and… (More)
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Highly Cited
2013
Highly Cited
2013
Weyl points and line nodes are three-dimensional linear point and line degeneracies between two bands. In contrast to two… (More)
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2013
2013
With the purpose of assessing the absorption coefficients of quantum dot solar cells, symmetry considerations are introduced into… (More)
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2010
2010
We examine the electronic structure and optical properties of 1.5-μm InAs/InGaAsP/InP quantum dash-in-a-well (DWELL) and dash-in… (More)
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2009
2009
We have developed a ballistic self-consistent code which couples the six-band k.p Hamiltonian to the Green function formalism. We… (More)
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2008
2008
For the first time strain additivity on III-V using prototypical (100) GaAs n- and p-MOSFETs is studied via wafer bending… (More)
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2007
2007
In this paper the band structures of GaxIn1-xNyAs1-y/GaAs strained quantum wells are investigated using 4x4 k.p Hamiltonian… (More)
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2006
2006
A comprehensive quantum anisotropic transport model for holes was used to study silicon PMOS inversion layer transport under… (More)
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2006
2006
There remains controversy surrounding the cause of the magnitude and temperature sensitivity of the threshold current density of… (More)
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