Juniperus osteosperma

Known as: Juniperus osteosperma (Torr.) Little 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1994-2015
0119942015

Papers overview

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2015
2015
Neotoma lepida (woodrat) browses on the leaves of Juniperus osteosperma near Dugway, UT. A comparison between woodrat (N. lepida… (More)
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2013
2013
Widespread piñon (Pinus edulis) mortality occurred across the southwestern USA during 2002-2003 in response to drought and bark… (More)
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2012
2012
Detoxification enzymes play a key role in plant-herbivore interactions, contributing to the on-going evolution of ecosystem… (More)
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2007
2007
As pinyon–juniper (specifically, Pinus monophylla and Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands in the western United States increase in… (More)
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2006
2006
Juniper species are noted for long-lived foliage, low and persistent gas exchange activity and drought tolerance. Because leaves… (More)
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2004
2004
Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma) is one of many plant species that produce large numbers of fruits containing parthenocarpic… (More)
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2002
2002
Water use and carbon acquisition were examined in a northern Utah population of Juniperus osteosperma (Torr.) Little. Leaf-level… (More)
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1999
1999
We determined how ecophysiological characteristics of two juniper species, Juniperus occidentalis Hook. (western juniper) and… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Pinyon–Juniper communities are found throughout the high deserts of the south-western United States, predominantly at elevations… (More)
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1994
1994
Xylem-tapping mistletoes transpire large volumes of water (E) while conducting photosynthesis (A) at low rates, thus maintaining… (More)
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