Junco insularis

Known as: Junco hyemalis insularis 
 
National Institutes of Health

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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Concentrations of gonadal steroids such as testosterone (T) often vary widely in natural populations, but the causes and… (More)
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2004
2004
An isolated population of dark-eyed juncos, Junco hyemalis, became established on the campus of the University of California at… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Monogamous and polygynous male songbirds generally differ in their breeding season profiles of circulating testosterone… (More)
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2001
2001
We determined seasonal changes in blood parasite infections in a free-living population of Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis… (More)
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2000
2000
Year-class differences in reproductive function were investigated in a free-living population of adult male Dark-eyed Juncos… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Maternally derived steroid hormones are known to be present in the yolks of avian eggs; however, the physiological mechanisms… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
In socially feeding birds and mammals, as group size increases, individuals devote less time to scanning their environment and… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Monogamous male birds typically allocate less e¡ort to courtship and more to parental behaviour than males of polygynous species… (More)
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Highly Cited
1990
Highly Cited
1990
Male, dark-eyed juncos, Junco hyemalis, were held in captivity under conditions simulating winter temperature and photoperiod… (More)
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