Jejunal Atresia

Known as: apple-peel syndrome, Imperforate jejunum, jejunum atresia 
A congenital malformation characterized by the absence of a normal opening in a part of the jejunum.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2013
Highly Cited
2013
Pomegranate extracts have been used for centuries in traditional medicine to confer health benefits in a number of inflammatory… (More)
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2011
2011
BACKGROUND Quercetin derivatives in onions have been regarded as the most important flavonoids to improve diabetic status in… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
AIMS To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of flavonoid-rich fractions derived from bergamot peel, a byproduct from the Citrus… (More)
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2005
2005
Small bowel atresia is associated with a large size discrepancy between the proximal and distal segments of bowel that has… (More)
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2005
2005
Hyphomycetous (Aspergillus fumigatus) and Phycomycetous (Mucor hiemalis) moulds were cultivated in vitro at room temperature (28… (More)
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1996
1996
Combined duodenal and jejunal atresia is extremely uncommon. The familial occurrence of congenital duodenal and small bowel… (More)
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Review
1987
Review
1987
Fifty-seven cases of apple peel jejunal atresia have been reported in the English literature. Patients with this anomaly have a… (More)
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1987
1987
Two siblings with multiple jejunal atresia and malrotation of the midgut are reported. In the first, incomplete rotation of the… (More)
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1987
1987
Apple peel deformity of the small bowel is a variant of jejunal atresia with a high mortality. Forty five percent of these… (More)
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1987
1987
Identical twins are reported, who associated with maternal anaphylactic shock at 101/2 weeks gestation, acquired a type IV… (More)
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