Heartwater Disease

Known as: Disease, Heartwater, Heartwater, Heartwater Disease [Disease/Finding] 
A tick-borne septicemic disease of domestic and wild ruminants caused by EHRLICHIA RUMINANTIUM.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1945-2018
0102019452017

Papers overview

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2001
2001
DNA samples from dogs presenting with symptoms suggestive of canine ehrlichiosis, but with no morulae detected on blood smears… (More)
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1997
1997
Cowdria ruminantium is a rickettsial parasite which causes heartwater, a economically important disease of domestic and wild… (More)
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1996
1996
The genes for the immunodominant major antigenic protein 1 (MAP1) of Cowdria ruminantium from four African and two Caribbean… (More)
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1995
1995
The sensitivities of a PCR assay and a DNA probe assay were compared for the detection of Cowdria ruminantium in Amblyomma ticks… (More)
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1994
1994
In two experiments, four and five goats were vaccinated by giving two subcutaneous injections of a preparation of inactivated… (More)
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1991
1991
A Senegalese (S) stock of Cowdria ruminantium was passaged on bovine umbilical endothelial cells with an average interval of 13.9… (More)
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1989
1989
Sheep, cattle and the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) were shown to remain carriers of heart-water (caused by Cowdria… (More)
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1989
1989
The bont tick, Amblyomma hebraeum, is the principal vector to southern African ruminants of heartwater (Cowdria ruminantium… (More)
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1987
1987
The first written record of what probably could have been heartwater originates from South Africa and dates back to 1838. Since… (More)
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1985
1985
Adult Ambylomma variegatum ticks were collected from 184 cattle, 13 sheep and one goat in Antigua, and ground in phosphate… (More)
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