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GPR34 gene

Known as: G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR 34, GPR34 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2019
2019
BackgroundNeuropathic pain is caused by sensory nerve injury, but effective treatments are currently lacking. Microglia are… Expand
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2015
2015
GPR34 is a Gi/o protein‐coupled receptor (GPCR) of the nucleotide receptor P2Y12‐like group. This receptor is highly expressed in… Expand
2013
2013
GPR34, a P2Y receptor family member, was identified as a candidate lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) receptor in 2006. However, it… Expand
2012
2012
GPR34 is a G protein-coupled receptor belonging to the P2Y family. Here, we attempted to resolve conflicting reports about… Expand
2012
2012
Lyso-PS (lyso-phosphatidylserine) has been shown to activate the G(i/o)-protein-coupled receptor GPR34. Since in vitro and in… Expand
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2012
2012
Genetic aberrations, including trisomies 3 and 18, and well-defined IGH translocations, have been described in marginal zone… Expand
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Microglia, monocytes, and peripheral macrophages share a common origin and many characteristics, but what distinguishes them from… Expand
2006
2006
Directed cloning approaches and large-scale sequencing of several vertebrate genomes unveiled many new members of the G-protein… Expand
Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
We have discovered three novel human genes, GPR34, GPR44, and GPR45, encoding family A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The… Expand
1999
1999
Based on structural similarities of an expressed sequence tag with the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor a cDNA clone… Expand