Flying ice cube

In molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the flying ice cube effect is a numerical integration artifact in which the energy of high-frequency… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1998-2015
012319982015

Papers overview

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2014
2014
A fundamental problem in remote sensing and radiative transfer simulations involving ice clouds is the ability to compute… (More)
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2012
2012
Sea-salt aerosol (SSA) particles are ubiquitous in the marine boundary layer and over coastal areas. Therefore SSA have ability… (More)
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2011
2011
Recent atmospheric measurements show that biological particles are a potentially important class of ice nuclei. Types of… (More)
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2009
2009
[1] Many soil-derived particles dominated by insoluble material, including Saharan dusts, are known to act as ice nuclei. If… (More)
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2007
2007
During the European heat wave summer 2003 with predominant high pressure conditions we performed a detailed study of upper… (More)
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2007
2007
This paper proposes a fast and efficient method for producing physically based animations of the ice melting phenomenon… (More)
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2002
2002
  • E. CHASSEFIE
  • 2002
Solar occultations performed with a spectrometer on board the Soviet spacecraft Phobos 2 (Blamont et al. 1991) provided data on… (More)
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2001
2001
The effect of ice accretion on aircraft performance and control during trim conditions was modeled and analyzed. A six degree-of… (More)
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