Fasciolopsiasis

Known as: Fasciolopsiases, Infection by Fasciolopsis buski, Infection by Fasciolopsis 
A small bowel infection that is caused by Fasciolopsis buski, which is endemic in the Far East and Southeast Asia, and which is transmitted via the… (More)

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1954-2017
01219542016

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Review
2017
Review
2017
PURPOSE To describe the clinical and sociodemographic profile of fasciolopsiasis in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS A chart… (More)
Is this relevant?
2015
2015
This study aimed to improve the understanding of the clinical characteristics of patients with fasciolopsiasis and thus reduce… (More)
Is this relevant?
2015
2015
PURPOSE To describe a newly discovered, previously unreported endemic focus of fasciolopsiasis in the Phulwaria village, under… (More)
Is this relevant?
2013
2013
A 5 year old girl hailing from Keraniganj, presented with the complaints of fever, periumbilical pain and vomiting. In vomitus… (More)
Is this relevant?
2009
2009
Infestation by the zoonotic trematode Fasciolopsis buski (fasciolopsiasis) is seen in several parts of South-East Asia. Abdominal… (More)
Is this relevant?
Review
2008
Review
2008
This article reviews plant-borne helminth infections caused by Fasciola hepatica/gigantica and Fasciolopsis buski. Besides having… (More)
  • table 1
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 4
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
2005
2005
Fasciolopsiasis is a disease caused by the largest intestinal fluke, Fasciolopsis buski. The disease is endemic in the Far East… (More)
Is this relevant?
Review
2001
Review
2001
Fasciolopsiasis, endemic to the Orient and Southeast Asia, is a snail-transmitted, intestinal, food-borne parasitic zoonosis… (More)
Is this relevant?
2000
2000
Fasciolopsiasis, or infection by the intestinal fluke, Fascilopsis buski, is endemic in the eastern states of our country. While… (More)
Is this relevant?
Review
1995
Review
1995
The most frequently reported parasite-related diarrheal diseases in tropical travellers are amibiaisis, giardiasis, and certain… (More)
Is this relevant?