FEB2 gene

Known as: FEB2, febrile convulsions 2 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1998-2014
01219982014

Papers overview

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2014
2014
BACKGROUND Febrile seizures (FS) represent the most common form of childhood seizures that occurs in 2-5 % of the children… (More)
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2004
2004
I diopathic epilepsies have a genetic basis and are characterised by the absence of an overt underlying neurological abnormality… (More)
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2002
2002
Evidence that febrile seizures have a strong genetic predisposition has been well documented. In families of probands with… (More)
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Review
2002
Review
2002
Febrile seizures are the most common form of convulsion, occurring in 2-5% of infants in Europe and North America and in 6-9% in… (More)
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2001
2001
We report a clinical and genetic study of a French family among whom febrile convulsions (FC) are associated with subsequent… (More)
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2000
2000
Febrile seizures (FSs) represent the most common form of childhood seizure. In the Japanese population, the incidence rate is as… (More)
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2000
2000
PURPOSE Two large Canadian kindreds appearing to segregate febrile convulsions as an autosomal dominant trait were evaluated for… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Febrile seizures affect approximately 3% of all children under six years of age and are by far the most common seizure disorder… (More)
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1998
1998
Febrile convulsions are a common form of childhood seizure. It is estimated that between 2 and 5% of children will have a febrile… (More)
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