Excoriation

Known as: Excoriation of Skin, SKIN EXCORIATION, excoriations 
Self-inflicted tearing or wearing off of skin.(NICHD)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2016
2016
IMPORTANCE Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) is a disabling, underrecognized condition in which individuals repeatedly… (More)
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Review
2007
Review
2007
It is important to determine the severity of atopic dermatitis (AD) for evaluation of disease improvement after and during… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
Uremic pruritus is a very common and frustrating condition for both patients and clinicians because no treatment has been… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
BACKGROUND Stoma-related complication rates vary between 10% and 70%, possibly because of varying lengths of follow-up. It is… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
AIM To prospectively audit stomas and to determine the nature and rate of complications and their relationship with various risk… (More)
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2003
2003
Psychogenic excoriation (PE), characterized by excessive scratching or picking of the skin, is not yet recognized as a symptom of… (More)
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Review
2001
Review
2001
Psychogenic excoriation (also called neurotic excoriation, acne excoriée, pathological or compulsive skin picking, and… (More)
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1999
1999
The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and efficacy of fluvoxamine in the treatment of psychogenic (neurotic) skin… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
BACKGROUND Psychogenic excoriation, characterized by excessive scratching or picking of the skin, is not yet recognized as a… (More)
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Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
Among 82 inpatients with psoriasis, 67% (55 patients) reported moderate or severe pruritus. The degree of depressive… (More)
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