Event calculus

The event calculus is a logical language for representing and reasoning about events and their effects first presented by Robert Kowalski and Marek… (More)
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1978-2017
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2004
2004
We present an implemented method for encoding reasoning problems of a discrete version of the classical logic event calculus in… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
As the interest in using policy-based approaches for systems management grows, it is becoming increasingly important to develop… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Protocols represent the allowed interactions among communicating agents. Protocols are essential in applications such as… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
The Event Calculus is a narrative based formalism for reasoning about actions and change originally proposed in logic programming… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
This article presents the event calculus, a logic-based formalism for representing actions and their effects. A circumscriptive… (More)
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1997
1997
In 1969 Cordell Green presented his seminal description of planning as theorem proving with the situation calculus. The most… (More)
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1995
1995
The event calculus was proposed as a formalism for reasoning about time and events. Through the years, however, a much simpler… (More)
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1995
1995
In this paper we study the diierences between two logic theories for temporal reasoning, the Situation Calculus and the Event… (More)
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Highly Cited
1992
Highly Cited
1992
D This paper investigates a special case of the event calculus, concerned with database updates. It discusses the way relational… (More)
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Highly Cited
1990
Highly Cited
1990
The Event Calculus of Kowalski and Sergot only deals with discrete change. This paper introduces a simplified version of the… (More)
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