Episodic ataxia type 1

Known as: ATAXIA, EPISODIC, WITH MYOKYMIA, AEMK, AEM 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2013
2013
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Heterozygous mutations in KCNA1 cause episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1), an ion channel disorder… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2013
Highly Cited
2013
The self has been the topic of philosophical inquiry for centuries. Neuropsychological data suggest that the declarative self can… (More)
Is this relevant?
2011
2011
Objective: Episodic Ataxia type 1 (EA1) is a monogenic channelopathy caused by mutations of the potassium channel gene KCNA1… (More)
Is this relevant?
2009
2009
Heterozygous mutations of KCNA1, the gene encoding potassium channel Kv1.1 subunits, cause episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1), which is… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • table 1
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) is a rare human neurological syndrome characterized by continuous myokymia and attacks of… (More)
  • figure 7
Is this relevant?
2006
2006
Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder characterized by constant muscle rippling movements… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
We evaluate the ability of the embedded-atom method ~EAM! potentials and the tight-binding ~TB! method to predict reliably… (More)
  • table I
  • table II
  • table III
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
Is this relevant?
2001
2001
Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA-1) is a neurological disorder arising from mutations in the Kv1.1 potassium channel alpha-subunit. EA… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
The principal goal of all numerical algorithms is to represent as faithfully and accurately as possible the underlying continuum… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
Review
1997
Review
1997
Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, disabling condition of autosomal dominant inheritance, but it is not a distinct clinical entity… (More)
Is this relevant?