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Enaphalodes

National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2018
2018
Abstract We describe approaches to addressing the perennial challenge of collecting a sufficient diversity of nontarget insects… Expand
2012
2012
ABSTRACT We used life table analyses to investigate age specific mortality and to better understand the population dynamics of… Expand
2011
2011
Extreme climate events are frequently important factors associated with episodes of forest decline. A recent oak decline event… Expand
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2010
2010
ABSTRACT Epidemic populations of Enaphalodes rufulus (Haldeman), red oak borer, a native longhorned wood boring beetle, were… Expand
2007
2007
Four mature northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.)–white oak (Quercus alba L.) stands in the Boston Mountains of northern Arkansas… Expand
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2007
2007
Abstract In the Ozark Mountains of northern Arkansas and southern Missouri, an oak decline event, coupled with epidemic… Expand
2006
2006
Abstract Oak-hickory forests in northwestern Arkansas, eastern Oklahoma and southern Missouri have recently experienced an oak… Expand
Review
2005
Review
2005
Epidemic populations of red oak borer, Enaphalodes rufulus (Haldeman), a native wood-boring cerambycid beetle, appear to be a… Expand
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2003
2003
Since not all research on Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (ALB) can be conducted in China or at North American sites where… Expand
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1974
1974
  • J. Galford
  • Journal of economic entomology
  • 1974
  • Corpus ID: 34322881
Enaphalodes rufulus (Haldeman) was artificially reared at 21.1, 26.7, and 32.2°C. Larvae reared at 21.1°C required ca. 50 days… Expand