DomainKeys Identified Mail

Known as: DKIM-Signature, Dkim, Domain Keys Identified Mail 
DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) is an email authentication method designed to detect email spoofing. It allows the receiver to check that an email… (More)
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Papers overview

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2012
2012
This experimental specification proposes a modification to DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) allowing advertisement of third… (More)
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Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) permits a person, role, or organization that owns the signing domain to claim some… (More)
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2011
2011
DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) allows an administrative mail domain (ADMD) to assume some responsibility for a message. Based… (More)
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2010
2010
DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) associates a "responsible" identity with a message and provides a means of verifying that the… (More)
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2009
2009
This updates RFC 4871, DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) Signatures. Specifically the document clarifies the nature, roles and… (More)
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2009
2009
DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) defines a domain-level authentication framework for email to permit verification of the source… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) defines a domain-level authentication framework for email using public-key cryptography and key… (More)
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2007
2007
Email protocols were designed to be flexible and forgiving, designed in a day when Internet usage was a cooperative thing. A side… (More)
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2006
2006
This document provides an analysis of some threats against Internet mail that are intended to be addressed by signature-based… (More)
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Review
2006
Review
2006
DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) Service Overview draft-ietf-dkim-overview-02 Status of this Memo By submitting this Internet… (More)
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