Dispersion Yellow 3

Known as: Disperse Yellow 3, D Yellow 3, Acetamide, N-(4-((2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)azo)phenyl)- 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1997-2018
0119972018

Papers overview

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2014
2014
This work deals with the electrocoagulation (EC) process for an organic dye removal. The chosen organic dye is C.I. disperse… (More)
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Review
2013
Review
2013
Allergic contact dermatitis to textile dyes is considered to be a rare phenomenon. A recent review reported a prevalence of… (More)
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2012
2012
Certain textile disperse dyes are known to cause allergic reactions of the human skin. Here, we examined 8 disperse dyes and 7… (More)
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2012
2012
BACKGROUND It is known that, in vitro, human skin bacteria are able to split disperse azo dyes into the corresponding aromatic… (More)
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2011
2011
BACKGROUND It is known that some patch-test preparations containing disperse dyes contain impurities with unknown relevance for… (More)
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2003
2003
From January 1996 to December 2000, 1098 children, including 667 subjects with suspected allergic contact dermatitis and 431… (More)
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2002
2002
This work investigates the relationship between polymer microstructure and drug release kinetics in the bioerodible polyanhydride… (More)
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1997
1997
Combined sensitizations to different azo dyes, probably based both on true cross-sensitization and on simultaneous positive… (More)
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