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Darwin Core

Darwin Core (often abbreviated to DwC) is an extension of Dublin Core for biodiversity informatics. It is meant to provide a stable standard… Expand
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Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2017
2017
Based on a dataset of 16,991 and 307 morphospecies of polychaete worms collected from 58 epibenthic sledge deployments across the… Expand
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2016
2016
Russia holds massive biodiversity data accumulated in botanical and zoological collections, literature publications, annual… Expand
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2016
2016
Darwin-SW (DSW) is an RDF vocabulary designed to complement the Biodiversity Information Standards (TDWG) Darwin Core Standard… Expand
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2013
2013
The Audubon Core Multimedia Resource Metadata Schema is a representation-free vocabulary for the description of biodiversity… Expand
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2012
2012
Darwin Core (DwC) defines a standard set of terms to describe the primary biodiversity data. Primary biodiversity data are data… Expand
2011
2011
Plant genetic resource collections provide novel materials to the breeding and research communities. Crop wild relatives may… Expand
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2009
2009
Cataloguing biological specimen is a important activity of biological museums world over. Software developed especially for this… Expand
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2009
2009
Despite the increasing recognition of a global shortage of taxonomists (the ‘taxonomic impediment’; see the Governments… Expand
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2007
2007
Over the last decade, several international networks have been implemented to give common access to distributed primary… Expand
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