Cremnochorites capensis

Known as: Cremnochorites capense, Gillias capensis, Tripterygium capense 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1997-2017
02419972017

Papers overview

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2014
2014
The occurrence of Pachysternum capense (Mulsant, 1844) (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae: Megasternini) outside its native range in sub… (More)
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2012
2012
Recent studies in citrus orchards confirmed that Citrus Greening, a heat sensitive citrus disease, similar to Huanglongbing (HLB… (More)
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2009
2006
2006
Antarctic procellariiform seabirds are known for their well-developed sense of smell, yet few behavioral experiments have… (More)
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2004
2004
Procellariiform seabirds (petrels, albatrosses and shearwaters) forage over thousands of square kilometres for patchily… (More)
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2000
2000
In 1994, the uncultured phloem-restricted bacteria of citrus huanglongbing (ex-greening) disease in Asia and Africa were… (More)
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1999
1999
We report five new species records from the Comoros Archipelago. Two of the species are known from outside the Archipelago… (More)
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1998
1998
Breeding success of Cape petrels at Nelson Island (South Shetland Islands) in 1991/1992 averaged 29%. Predation by skuas… (More)
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1998
1998
All of the fish identified in stomach contents and regurgitations of breeding and chick Cape petrels collected during January and… (More)
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1997
1997
Timing and duration of the breeding cycle of the Cape petrel Daption capense were studied during two breeding seasons (1990/1991… (More)
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