Conscience

Known as: Consciences 
The cognitive and affective processes which constitute an internalized moral governor over an individual's moral conduct.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2014
2014
Some bioethicists argue that conscientious objectors in health care should have to justify themselves, just as objectors in the… (More)
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2010
2010
AIM This paper is a report of a study of patterns of perceptions of conscience, stress of conscience and burnout in relation to… (More)
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2009
2009
The aim of this study is to illuminate the meaning of encounters with a troubled conscience among psychiatric therapists… (More)
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2008
2008
AIMS The aim was to study the relationship between conscience and burnout among care-providers in older care, exploring the… (More)
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2008
2008
AIM The main purpose of this study was to examine factors related to 'stress of conscience' i.e. stress related to a troubled… (More)
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2005
2005
Conscience consists of the cognitive, affective, relational, and other processes that influence how young children construct and… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Effortful control, the ability to suppress a dominant response to perform a subdominant response, was assessed in 106 children… (More)
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Highly Cited
1994
Highly Cited
1994
Multiple manifestations of emerging conscience, their development, organization, and links with temperament were studied in 171… (More)
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Highly Cited
1991
Highly Cited
1991
Toddlerhood antecedents of conscience were examined in 58 8-10-year-old children. The measures of conscience, such as general… (More)
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