Computational logic

Known as: Logical computation 
Computational logic is the use of logic to perform or reason about computation. It bears a similar relationship to computer science and engineering… (More)
Wikipedia

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2012
2012
People who write papers on theorem proving have unfortunately tended to ignore the practical computational questions which arise… (More)
Is this relevant?
2007
2007
The paper discusses tools for teaching logic used in Logic & Proofs, a web-based introduction to modern logic that has been taken… (More)
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
In this paper we describe a distributed object oriented logic programming language in which an object is a collection of threads… (More)
  • figure 7
  • figure 7
  • figure 8
  • figure 9
  • figure 11
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
  • John W. Lloyd
  • Computational Logic: Logic Programming and Beyond
  • 2002
This paper presents the case for the use of higher-order logic as a foundation for computational logic. A suitable… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Data Types Joint with the 5th COMPASS Workshop, S. Margherita, Italy, May 30–June 3, 1994, Selected Papers, Lecture Notes in… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
This paper presents a new logic programming language for modelling Agents and Multi-Agent systems in computational logic. The… (More)
Is this relevant?
2000
2000
We introduce the concept of reflection principle as a knowledge representation paradigm in a computational logic setting… (More)
Is this relevant?
1997
1997
We consider the problem of nding models for logic programs P via xed points of immediate consequence operators TP Certain… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
 
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1980
Highly Cited
1980
Never doubt with our offer, because we will always give what you need. As like this updated book, you may not find in the other… (More)
  • figure 1.1
  • figure 3.1
  • figure 3.2
  • figure 4.1
  • figure 6.1
Is this relevant?