Cirrhosis, Cryptogenic

Known as: Cryptogenic Cirrhosis, cirrhosis cryptogenic 
Cirrhosis in which no causative agent can be identified.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2006
Review
2006
Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the lynchpin between steatosis and cirrhosis in the spectrum of nonalcoholic fatty liver… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Cryptogenic cirrhosis is a common cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality in the United States. Nonalcoholic fatty liver… (More)
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Review
2003
Review
2003
Fatty liver disease that develops in the absence of alcohol abuse is recognized increasingly as a major health burden. This… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
BACKGROUND & AIMS Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) may progress to cirrhosis; whether NASH plays also a role in the… (More)
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Review
2002
Review
2002
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is present in up to one third of the general population and in the majority of patients… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Despite the rising incidence of obesity and diabetes, there is little emphasis on morbidity and mortality from obesity-related… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Many subjects with cryptogenic cirrhosis have underlying nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The natural history of NASH-related… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
We characterized 70 consecutive patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis to assess major risks for liver disease. Each patient was… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
A novel DNA virus, TT-virus (TTV), has been reported in patients with non-A-G posttransfusion hepatitis in Japan. We sought to… (More)
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Highly Cited
1990
Highly Cited
1990
Forty-two patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis were followed for a median of 4.5 yr (range = 1.5 to 21.5 yr). Except for… (More)
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